​​BED BUG CONFIDENTIAL: AN EXPERT EXPLAINS HOW TO DEFEND AGAINST THE DREADED PESTS

Kate Wong, Scientific American, January 23, 2012
​Everything you ever wanted to know about bed bugs but were afraid to ask
Chances are, you or someone you know has had a run-in with bed bugs. It might have happened in a scrupulously clean bedroom. Or maybe it was a hotel room, office or college dorm. In the February issue of Scientific American entomologist Kenneth Haynes of the University of Kentucky explains how, after a lengthy absence, bed bugs are staging a comeback. The good news is scientists are intensively studying these insects, and their insights suggest novel ways of detecting the bugs and eradicating infestations. Some of those potential solutions are a long way off, however. In the meantime the best bet is to avoid bringing bed bugs home in the first place. I called Haynes to ask him how to do that and what to do if one suspects an infestation (eek!), among a bunch of other practical-minded questions.

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KILLING BED BUGS WITH HEAT

​An article on the advantages of killing bed bugs with heat published on www.bedbugs.org

Bed bugs can be horrible if they get into your home. You may not be able to keep them from spreading, and killing them all can be a huge and frustrating task. You need to use the best methods to get rid of them so that they do not spread and so that they never come back.

One method that you may be interested in looking into is killing them with heat. If you have not even heard of this method before, you certainly need to read about it and decide if it is right for you.

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​​SCIENTISTS EXPLAIN HOW BED BUGS SHRUG OFF PESTICIDES

​​Infection Control Today September 11, 2013
​The bed bug’s most closely guarded secrets — stashed away in protective armor that enables these blood-sucking little nasties to shrug off insecticides and thrive in homes and hotels — were on the agenda at a major scientific meeting. In a talk at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society, scientists are describing identification of the genes responsible for pesticide-resistance in bed bugs, and the implications for millions of people trying to cope with bed bug infestations that have been resurging for more than a decade.

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SCIENTISTS MAY HAVE FOUND A WAY TO DESTROY THE BEDBUG

​​Fox News Science February 3, 2016
Scientists have for the first time sequenced the genome of New York City bed bugs, a project that could one day offer a way to contain one of the world’s most hated insects.
One group of researchers, in a Nature Communications study, found that genes in the bedbug, Cimex lectularius, are expressed the most after it feeds on blood for the first time. The group, led by the American Museum of Natural History’s Jeffrey Rosenfeld, also compared bed bug DNA from every New York subway station and found those from different parts of the city had different genetic makeups.

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MASSIVE RESISTANCE: BED BUGS’ GENETIC ARMOR SHIELDS THEM FROM PESTICIDES

​Marissa Fessenden Scientific American March 14, 2013
The nocturnal pests are equipped with a large array of genes that thwart chemical sprays, but scientists are probing for weaknesses
One of humankind’s most intimate blood-sucking roommates, the bed bug, is notoriously resistant to the pesticides used against it. Now researchers have pinpointed the genes responsible for this resistance. The finding highlights how ineffective our current chemical arsenal has become, and could help researchers design pesticides better able to destroy the pests.

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CUTICLE THICKENING IN A PYRETHROID-RESISTANT STRAIN OF THE COMMON BED BUG

​Research article published in PLOS ONE on April 13, 2016 by David G. Lilly, Sharissa L. Latham, Cameron E. Webb, Stephen L. Doggett

Abstract
​Thickening of the integument as a mechanism of resistance to insecticides is a well recognised phenomenon in the insect world and, in recent times, has been found in insects exhibiting pyrethroid-resistance. Resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in the common bed bug,Cimex lectularius L., is widespread and has been frequently inferred as a reason for the pest’s resurgence. Overexpression of cuticle depositing proteins has been demonstrated in pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs although, to date, no morphological analysis of the cuticle has been undertaken in order to confirm a phenotypic link. This paper describes examination of the cuticle thickness of a highly pyrethroid-resistant field strain collected in Sydney, Australia, in response to time-to-knockdown upon forced exposure to a pyrethroid insecticide. Mean cuticle thickness was positively correlated to time-to-knockdown, with significant differences observed between bugs knocked-down at 2 hours, 4 hours, and those still unaffected at 24 hours. Further analysis also demonstrated that the 24 hours survivors possessed a statistically significantly thicker cuticle when compared to a pyrethroid-susceptible strain of C. lectularius. This study demonstrates that cuticle thickening is present within a pyrethroid-resistant strain ofC. lectularius and that, even within a stable resistant strain, cuticle thickness will vary according to time-to-knockdown upon exposure to an insecticide. This response should thus be considered in future studies on the cuticle of insecticide-resistant bed bugs and, potentially, other insects.

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​BED BUGS HAVE GROWN THICKER SKIN TO AVOID EXTERMINATION

​Ed Cara, Medical Daily April 13, 2016

Say what you will about bed bugs (Cimex lectularius), they’re certainly a worthy six-legged foe.
A new study published Wednesday in the journal PLOS-One has found that bed bugs are fighting back against our commonly used insecticides partly through a remarkably simple strategy — by growing thicker skin. More accurately, they’re growing a thicker cuticle, the term for its tough fingernail-like exoskeleton.

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​EPA EVALUATION ON PESTICIDES TO CONTROL BED BUGS

The EPA has registered more than 300 products for use against bed bugs. Most of these can be used by consumers, but a few are registered for use only by specially trained professionals. EPA evaluates data on the safety and the effectiveness of the products before approving them.

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HEAT TREATMENT SOLUTIONS FOR ELIMINATING BED BUGS

There are various treatment solutions for dealing with bed bugs. Heat treatment continues to be a popular consideration for many people who seek an effective way to treat infestations. Bed bugs are parasites and require a host whose blood they can feed on.
Common infestation spots for bed bugs include mattresses, headboards and box springs. They are small enough to hide in tiny cracks in walls. A bed bug infestation is most likely to be within a short distance from the host’s bed.

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STUDY FINDS BED BUGS MAY BE LESS SUSCEPTIBLE TO FREEZING TEMPERATURES

Exposing bed bug-infested clothing or other small items to freezing temperatures may be a viable control option for people at risk of bed bug infestations. However, a new study has found that bed bugs may be less susceptible to freezing temperatures than previously reported.
In an article in the Journal of Economic Entomology called “Cold Tolerance of Bed Bugs and Practical Recommendations for Control,” the authors describe how exposing bed bugs to freezing temperatures affects them, and they provide practical recommendations for management of potentially infested items.

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NEW RESEARCH: FOGGERS INEFFECTIVE AGAINST BED BUGS

Consumer products known as “bug bombs” or “foggers” have been sold for decades for use against many common household insects. However, recent research published in the Journal of Economic Entomology (JEE) shows these products to be ineffective against bed bugs.

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